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Portraying Yourself Professionally Through Digital Conversations

Showing yourself at a professional when your whole relationship occurs online can be a challenge. Some people are much better in person and may feel that an online communication style seems awkward and hard to do. But as a copywriter in the digital age requires that you are able to communicate yourself clearly and professionally to all clients without seeing them face to face.

This post is an excerpt from "Copywriting for Beginners: Crafting Quality Content, Understanding the Market, Networking with Clients and Building a Freelance Career," which is available now on Amazon here.
This post is an excerpt from “Copywriting for Beginners: Crafting Quality Content, Understanding the Market, Networking with Clients and Building a Freelance Career,” which is available now on Amazon here.

As a copywriter, showing your professionalism through writing should not be too difficult. You want someone to hire you for how you portray yourself in writing, you should be able to do this successfully. If you find that it is difficult to write eloquent and professional emails or to keep up with other correspondences with clients, it may be time to brush up on your skills.

Digital communication occurs all throughout your relationship with the client. Some clients have had trouble with communication with their freelancers in the past and may use this form of communication to determine whether you are the right fit for the job. Take extra care in your written correspondences to ensure that you are impressing your potential employer.

There are a few things that you should keep in all of your correspondences with potential and current clients including:

  • Do not use slang—your clients are your employer. Keep this in mind when you want to use lol or other slang terms in your correspondence with them. Use proper words at all times.
  • Address the client properly—Sir or Ma’am is often appropriate. If you are not sure whether you are talking to a man or a woman, which can happen if you apply on some writing board jobs, just skip the familiar terms like ‘dude’ and ‘man.’ Some people find this offensive and it is really hard to show that you are professional when using these terms.
  • Be clear and concise—clients are just as busy as you are. Don’t write ten pages of content when a paragraph will be plenty to get your point. Use the words you mean to use and keep the correspondence to just the important information that your client looks for.
  • Stay on point—your clients don’t need to know everything about your whole life. They are simply interested in getting an update or answers to their questions. Start with a professional greeting, tell them the information they asked for, add in some information that may be of use, and then end the correspondence.
  • Do not get too familiar—even if you’ve worked for a client for a long time, don’t get too familiar with them. Make sure to keep all conversation related to the work you’re doing. Keep things professional at all times.

Answer their questions—nothing annoys a client more than asking a direct question to their freelancer and getting the run around. Usually this means that you are trying to hide things from the client. Always answer any question that the client asks you and don’t try to skate around something, no matter how uncomfortable. The client would rather know early on that you can’t finish the project on time then be led along for weeks.

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This post is an excerpt from “Copywriting for Beginners: Crafting Quality Content, Understanding the Market, Networking with Clients and Building a Freelance Career,” which is available on Amazon here

Barry Falls Jr
Barry is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, where he studied sociology, journalism, and business entrepreneurship. He has over five years of experience working with small web-based startups to assist them with growing their engagement and creating online communities around their brand. He's the editor of Frontier Desk.

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