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The copywriting proposal is one of the most important things for your copywriting career. This is like the cover letter of your business. It provides the clients with all the information they need to determine if you would fit for the job.

This post is an excerpt from "Copywriting for Beginners: Crafting Quality Content, Understanding the Market, Networking with Clients and Building a Freelance Career," which is available now on Amazon here.
This post is an excerpt from “Copywriting for Beginners: Crafting Quality Content, Understanding the Market, Networking with Clients and Building a Freelance Career,” which is available now on Amazon here.

There are a few ways that you can craft your proposal. Some copywriters choose to write a personalized proposal for each job they apply to. This allows them to answer all the questions that the client has about a proposal and shows a personal touch that often impresses clients.

If the client wants to know about your specific experience in a topic, you can write more extensively about that topic with this method. You can explain how long the project would take, how many revisions are included in your price, and the price you will charge. This can save time on the back and forth between you and the client, but it does often take longer since you need to craft the proposal for each client.

Another option you can use is to have a premade proposal. This proposal would have the basics of your copywriting experience, talks about your normal rates and terms of service, and anything else that might be important to the client. This proposal would work for most clients and you can change it up a bit if the client is looking for something specific. This proposal can save a lot of time, because you can use it on each client.

Regardless of which option you choose for your proposal, there are certain things that this cover letter should include. Some of the aspects that should be present in every proposal include:

  • Your name and contact information
  • Your educational background if applicable
  • Your past writing experience
  • Links to your online portfolio if available
  • Links to other portfolio samples
  • Timeframe to complete the project
  • The price you will charge to complete this project.
  • Any other information the client specifically asks you in their job posting.

This information helps the client to make a good choice for the project. You want to always make sure that you’re completely honest in your portfolio. If there are any fabrications or exaggerations, you could end up with an assignment that you’re not equipped to complete, which will result in a negative experience for the client and possibly a negative review.

Sometimes you may be a great writer, but the tone of voice you use or another aspect of your proposal does not quite match up with what the client is looking for. But that’s alright; just keep trying. A well crafted proposal helps the client see how professional you are and you are more likely to get a job.

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This post is an excerpt from “Copywriting for Beginners: Crafting Quality Content, Understanding the Market, Networking with Clients and Building a Freelance Career,” which is available on Amazon here

Barry Falls Jr
Barry is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, where he studied sociology, journalism, and business entrepreneurship. He has over five years of experience working with small web-based startups to assist them with growing their engagement and creating online communities around their brand. He's the editor of Frontier Desk.

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