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To get paid as a copywriter, you need to be able to craft content that is high quality. Your clients will not pay you for work that is handed in late, work with lots of grammatical mistakes, or work that doesn’t even follow the required template or topic of the project. Quality content gets you the best rates on projects and happy clients that will give you more work down the line. This chapter will take some time to discuss how to provide quality content to your clients.

Research the Topic

Before you can craft quality content for your client, you need to do some research on the topic. Even if you have some ideas about the topic, you need to spend some time looking up different subtopics or important information that will make the book unique.

This post is an excerpt from "Copywriting for Beginners: Crafting Quality Content, Understanding the Market, Networking with Clients and Building a Freelance Career," which is available now on Amazon here.
This post is an excerpt from “Copywriting for Beginners: Crafting Quality Content, Understanding the Market, Networking with Clients and Building a Freelance Career,” which is available now on Amazon here.

A good way to start is to research the top keywords the client wants you to use. This can help to show which subjects readers are interested in the most when it comes to this topic. If the client just gave you a title and is giving you some free reign with this topic, go ahead and pick out some subjects that have a lot of information and will provide a lot of interest to your potential reader.

Only go for the information that will actually help the reader. Your client is going to sell this book as one of the best for its niche. If you just fill it with a lot of useless information that isn’t worth anything to the reader, your client will get bad reviews, not make money, and will choose another freelancer next time.

In some cases, the client will have a specific outline they want you to follow. In this case, they will list out the chapters as well as the subheadings they want you to use before submitting the book. This closes in what you are able to write about, but you can still get creative and find some information that is useful, unique, and will really help out the reader even within your guidelines.

The higher quality your product is, the more value it has to the client. You want to provide them with a book that will get a lot of good reviews and one that is easy to entice readers to purchase. The more successful you are with this goal, the more successful the client will become and they are more likely to choose you for more projects down the line.

Ask Questions When Needed

Most clients are easy to get along with and will either give you free reigns to let the project lead you or they will provide a lot of details on how they would like the project to go. Both of these options are nice because there aren’t a lot of questions to ask and you can get right to work. But any time you have a question, make sure to get an answer from the client before proceeding.

This can be difficult for the new freelancer. They are excited to get started on the project and don’t want to wait to hear back a few days from the client. But this can lead to you accomplishing a lot of work that is all wrong. If you had waited to hear the answer to your questions, you would know the exact way the client wanted the project to go. Sometimes, you may have been right and have the perfect project, but if you are wrong, you will need to redo the project before the client will accept, and you wasted time that could have been spent on something else.

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This post is an excerpt from “Copywriting for Beginners: Crafting Quality Content, Understanding the Market, Networking with Clients and Building a Freelance Career,” which is available on Amazon here

Barry Falls Jr
Barry is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, where he studied sociology, journalism, and business entrepreneurship. He has over five years of experience working with small web-based startups to assist them with growing their engagement and creating online communities around their brand. He's the editor of Frontier Desk.

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